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Revellers flocked to Britain’s pubs on Sunday night for one last hurrah, hours before the new ‘rule of six’ came into force at midnight.

Thousands of pubgoers were out across the country despite coronavirus cases continuing to rise – with fears friends maybe separated for months and Christmas ruined under the latest restrictions.

It comes after the full details on the new law banning large social gatherings were only outlined just 15 minutes before they went into force.

People now face fines of up to £3,200 if they fail to abide.

The rule applies to both indoor and outdoor settings and follows a rapid increase in the number of daily positive cases.

More than 3,000 Covid-19 cases were recorded in the UK for the third day in a row on Sunday – the first time since May that cases were above 3,000 on three consecutive days.

Aside from limited exemptions, including work and education, police will be able to disperse gatherings of more than six people and issue fines ranging from £100 to £3,200.

But many Brits are skeptical about the latest changes – the first major rule tightening on countrywide freedoms since lockdown began on March 23.

Aaron Leighton, 23, was out on Sunday celebrating a pal’s birthday as part of a group of 10, telling The Sun he “couldn’t care less”.

“I know people who came back from Spain and didn’t quarantine and what has anyone done about that? Nothing.

“This is the same. I can’t see anyone paying these fines they are threatening us with. I certainly won’t.”

While 32-year-old Alan Dean, 49, told the newspaper “everyone is flouting the rules” and dad Haydn Ledbetter said the new law is “idiotic”.

The airport employee said if the ‘rule of six’ is still in place at Christmas he won’t be sticking to it.

Tough new Covid-19 lockdown measures were announced for parts of the UK on Friday as cases continued to rise and as the R number – the reproduction number of coronavirus transmission – climbed above one.

According to Government advisers, the last time R was above one was in early March.

This content was originally published here.